Piscologia | Blog
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Enjoying Peruvian Pisco in Okinawa: A Historical Perspective

Maurice Dudley From Blue Habu

 

PiscoLogía Pisco Acholado recently reached the shores of Okinawa and into the hands of Blue Habu Trade Group. This newly founded relationship with Blue Habu is not only an important milestone for both parties; it also symbolizes a deep-rooted cultural bond between Okinawa and Peru.

 

The connection between Peru and Okinawa dates back to the early 1900’s, when vast quantities of Okinawans left their homes in search of a better life. Many settled in South America. In Peru, they formed communities in the coastal areas, where they cultivated agricultural fields to provide for their families. This influx of Okinawans enriched the Peruvian culture in innumerable ways, including the diversification of food and the creation of “Nikkei”, the fusion of Japanese and Peruvian cuisine.

 

Currently, the alliance between Okinawa and Peru remains just as strong, manifested in the exchange of goods and movement of people. Because of this historical significance, we at PiscoLogía are especially proud to be working with Blue Habu Trade Group.

 

So, if you have the pleasure of visiting Okinawa, be sure to get your hands on some PiscoLogía and reflect on this very important part of history!

 

 

Sources:

Mitchell, John. “Welcome Home, Okinawa”. Japan Times. 22 October 2016.

Hatlestad, Kari, “Peruvian Food: the Social and Cultural Origins of Peruvian Food” (2017). University Honors Theses. Paper 367.

Peruvian Pisco Grapes: Acholado vs. Quebranta

 

Since PiscoLogía Pisco Quebranta hit the shelves in the USA last October, many people have asked us to explain the differences between Acholado and Quebranta. Let’s talk about what “Quebranta” means and how it compares to PiscoLogía Pisco Acholado.

 

Quebranta is a variety of grape used to make Peruvian pisco, just like Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay are types of wine grapes. In Peru, there are 8 grapes used in pisco production: Quebranta, Negra Criolla, Mollar, Uvina (non-aromatic) and Italia, Torontel, Moscatel, and Albilla (aromatic).

 

Acholado pisco is made from a blend of grapes or a blend of piscos. Nati, our master distiller, makes a perfect concoction of Quebranta and Italia grapes to create an Acholado that can be both mixable in cocktails or enjoyed neat.

 

Here is a chart to compare the two:

 

PiscoLogía Acholado PiscoLogía Quebranta
Aromas Pecan and orange blossom Grassy, herbal, sweet caramelized banana
Flavors Balanced, matured dried currant and bananas Toasted almonds, pecans and tart green apples
Pairing Recommendation: Semi-sweet chocolate Camembert and apples
Mix it in this cocktail: “Eggs Benedictine”

2 oz PiscoLogía Acholado

1 oz Pineapple Syrup

1 oz Lime

1/2 oz Benedictine

Egg white

Fresh grated nutmeg (garnish)

Serve on the rocks


“Grape on Grape on Grape”

2 oz PiscoLogía Quebranta

.5 oz Manzanilla Sherry

.5 oz Punte E Mes Sweet Vermouth

Serve neat

 

 

PiscoLogía Teams with Liberation Distribution

At PiscoLogía, we are always looking for ways to support innovative companies. It makes it even more exciting when we benefit from the creativity of these enterprises. For that reason, it is our pleasure to announce that we have joined forces with LibDib Distribution, Inc to distribute PiscoLogía in New York and California. Using a modern web platform, LibDib makes selling, searching and purchasing easy and convenient for everyone.

Here is how it works:

  • We list our PiscoLogía Pisco Acholado and PiscoLogía Pisco Quebranta on LibDib’s website.
  •  Restaurants, bars & retailers in California and New York purchase our pisco online using an extremely efficient process.
  • We directly ship PiscoLogía to the buyer.
  •  LibDib pays us within 30 days.

 

The simple process is a refreshing change to traditional ways of distributing liquor in the United States. Thank you to T & R Wines and Liquors, Inc in Potsdam, NY (www.tandrwines.com) for being our first LibDib customer! If you are located in California or New York, you can find our products by clicking on the link below:

Libdib.com

Pagapu

Every year in August, when there is a new moon, the same ritual takes place. On a Tuesday or Thursday evening, Don Lucho, Azpitia’s shaman, is called to give thanks to the land, in a process called “Pagapu”.

At midnight, Don Lucho walks with us through the vineyard, saying ancient prayers that he learned from his elders. He burns incense and lignum vitae to purify the vineyard and to give thanks to “Pachamama”, the Mother Earth of the Incas, for her generosity in providing an abundant harvest and successful PiscoLogía production.

At the end of the ceremony, Don Lucho asks for permission from the Apus (the sacred mountains of the Incas), to open up Mother Earth’s womb so she can receive our offerings. At the highest point of the vineyard, we dig a small hole. With a small ceremonial light, we humbly and respectfully offer her gifts of coca leaves, pisco, sweets, and tobacco. This is to feed Pachamama and return everything that she has provided for us.

The offerings are then carefully covered with soil. A small wooden cross decorated with flowers is placed on this symbolic burial ground.  

Year after year, we show the same love, dedication, and respect to Mother Nature to ensure a successful production of PiscoLogía.