Closing the Gender Gap by Honoring Blanca Varela

Blanca varela

Credit: Stefany2121

We set out to write a blog post about literary references to Peruvian pisco since the word “pisco” was first documented in Peru in the 16th century. It was pleasantly surprising to find that many prominent writers from around the world have written about Peruvian pisco over the course of five centuries.

However, our euphoria soon dissipated when we realized that none of the historical texts we studied were written by women. While we do appreciate the literary contributions of males, especially when the subject is pisco, we decided to scrap our original blog idea. The absence of women in this realm compelled us to discuss a subject that is even more pressing for us: the gender gap.

Gender inequality is not just a historical phenomenon and it is not limited to published works. It is prevalent and oppressive in present day, from the way we divide household duties to the lack of women in management level positions. As explained in Global Issues: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment, “Globally, women have fewer opportunities for economic participation than men, less access to basic and higher education, greater health and safety risks, and less political representation”. This issue affects every country. In fact, it is so ubiquitous that it will take 108 more years to close the gender gap around the world (World Economic Forum).

Although this may seem dire, there are ways to accelerate equality between the sexes. One way is by celebrating the achievements of females. The National Women’s History Alliance encourages people to recognize the dignity and accomplishments of women because it promotes higher self-esteem in girls and greater respect toward women in boys. As a result, girls perform better in school and communities become less violent. Greater self-esteems and appreciation of women are not universal cures, but they are an important part of the process of achieving gender equality.

Taking this advice of the National Women’s History Alliance, we would like to highlight the accomplishments of one admirable female poet, Blanca Varela. As a bonus, we will demonstrate how Peruvian pisco played a role in her artistic exploration.

Considered one of Peru’s greatest poets, Blanca Varela was born in Lima in 1926. Her mother, Serafina Quinteras, was a composer, poet, writer, singer and journalist. Following her mother’s footsteps and with persuasion from Octavio Paz, Blanca published her first poetry book in 1959. She won many awards in her lifetime, including the Federico García Lorca International Poetry Prize in 2006. She was the first woman to ever receive that prestigious award.

In a short note titled “Amigos, fantasmas y recuerdos”, written in 1974, Blanca discussed the pisco cocktails she frequently drank at the Peña Pancho Fierro, a gathering place in the Plaza de San Martín in downtown Lima. She didn’t reveal the “secret recipe” of the pisco concoction with macerated fruit. However, she did discuss how inspired she felt in the intimate company of Peru’s most prominent artistic figures. The “magic circle” included Sebastián Salazar Bondy, Teresa Carvallo, Emilio Adolfo Westphalen, Martín Adán, César Moro and Fernando de Szyszlo. In “Amigos, fantasmas y recuerdos”, Blanca sentimentally recalls the time she spent at the Peña Pancho Fierro (Jochamowitz). We are happy pisco was part of that experience.

Recognizing Blanca Varela is a small advancement in closing the gender gap. We hope her accomplishments will forge a path for other females in the future so the next time we revisit written works about pisco, we will find contemporary female’s names next to men’s. We know we can’t change history, but we can influence the future.

To close this post, we would like to share a poem written by Blanca Varela, Curriculum Vitae:

let’s say you won the race
and the prize
was another race
you didn’t savor the wine of victory
but your own salt
you never listened to hurrahs
but dog barks
and your shadow
your own shadow
was your only
and disloyal competitor

Sources:

“Blanca Varela.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 21 Apr. 2019, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blanca_Varela.

“Global Issues: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment.” Global Issues: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment, www.peacecorps.gov/educators/resources/global-issues-gender-equality-and-womens-empowerment/.

The Global Gender Gap Report 2018. World Economic Forum, 2018, The Global Gender Gap Report 2018, www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2018.pdf.

Jochamowitz, Luis. “’Una Pequeñísima Puerta’.” Caretas Ilustración Peruana, www2.caretas.pe/Main.asp?T=3082&S=&id=12&idE=1263&idSTo=774&idA=75746#.XN1kNaZ7mu4.

Varela, Blanca. “Curriculum Vitae.” PoemHunter.com, 27 Aug. 2016, www.poemhunter.com/poem/curriculum-vitae-4/.

“Why Women’s History?” National Women’s History Alliance, nationalwomenshistoryalliance.org/why-womens-history/.

A sommelier talks Peruvian Pisco: Part 1

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This is part 1 of a series of interviews with Fernando Gonzales-Lattini, a sommelier specialized in pisco, vigneron and producer of premium wine in the Peruvian Andes.

How do you taste pisco and train your palate?

“To properly taste a pisco, you need a pisco snifter, like the photo shown above. In a tasting, a sommelier always evaluates 3 aspects: appearance, aroma and flavor. First, take a look at how the pisco looks. A good pisco must be clear and dense. Swirl the pisco around in the snifter to test its viscosity. A viscid pisco will form thick legs on the side of the glass. This is an indication that the pisco is full-bodied and has a good ratio of alcohol/glycerol. Transparency is also very important. Hold the glass up to the light to observe its color. Peruvian pisco is clear when it runs off the still, nothing is added to it, and it isn’t aged in barrels. For those reasons, it should be as clear as water in the bottle.

To detect aromas, I always recommend that people waft toward their noses instead of smelling directly from the snifter. If you inhale too closely, you can overwhelm your sense of smell, making it impossible to distinguish aromas. Piscos made from different grapes will have different descriptors. For example, a quebranta will commonly smell like banana, mango, pecans and raisins. An aromatic pisco like Italia will smell like fruit and flowers such as jasmine. Once you have observed the aromas and appearance, it’s time to taste.

When you taste a pisco, it should feel smooth in your mouth and throat. At no time should you feel a burning or harsh sensation. Identify in your mouth what flavors it has. You should be able to taste the same aromas that you smelled. For example, if you smelled pecans, you should taste pecans. You might be able to discover other flavors too, so pay close attention to how the flavors might change at different stages in the tasting process.

This is the general idea of how to conduct a pisco tasting. Remember that it takes practice to detect the different flavors and aromas of pisco. The more you do it, the more trained your nose and palate will become.”

The Many Facets of Kami Kenna

kami kenna, pisco, piscologia, women owned liquor business, peruvian pisco

 

 

Kami recently described herself as a Matryoshka doll, her layers unstacked by life experiences, a journey of self-awareness as she progresses through her career. However, when I think of Kami, I envision a mass of snow tumbling down a steep slope, accumulating the necessary mass to gain force, avalanching to its destination.

 

In the case of Kami, both metaphors apply. She is introspective like the innermost Matryoshka. But like an avalanche, she is also indomitable. Kami is multi-faceted; an avid researcher, activist, spirits specialist, distiller, businesswoman and visionary leader. Determined but intuitive while fulfilling those roles, she cares for her community as she continues her crusade.

 

Many exciting endeavors await my business partner. Drink a Seat, a blog that documents her extensive knowledge of food and drink, will become a wild success. She will complete a Master’s degree in Food Studies at NYU (yes, I said NYU!) where she will continue her research on Peruvian pisco, mezcal and beyond. Her sustainable distillery will revolutionize the way people think about liquor. She will change mentalities through education through her future podcast. Kami won’t stop until PiscoLogía is the best, most widely distributed pisco in the world. More importantly, she will care for the earth and its people while reaping its precious edible ingredients.

 

Kami’s past experiences gave her the tools to spearhead a path to success. As a young child, she used to spend numerous hours at her grandparents’ pharmacy in Northern Idaho. She passed the time by observing the business operations and playing with the cash register, punching random numbers to record imaginary sales. Her grandpa reproached her carelessness. Little did he know, his granddaughter was learning how to run a business and how to be accountable. Kami also experimented with food in her kitchen as an adolescent, learning to combine flavors, aromas and ingredients, information she would use in the future to become one of the best bartenders in the Northwest.

 

It was in the Portland community that she found her sense of belonging and the drive to learn more. She moved there at the age of 18, training under the best bartenders at her uncle’s bar, the Brazen Bean. Years later, the lessons learned from that apprenticeship led her to win a cocktail competition. The grand prize was a trip to Peru. Throughout all this, her past was the force behind her – observing her grandparents’ business, food experimentation, and mixing ingredients with liquor to create masterpieces.

 

In Peru, Nati and I recognized her talent, industry knowledge and intuition. Inviting her to become partner of PiscoLogía was the obvious choice. She built the concept that encapsulates our craft pisco brand now. But she didn’t stop there. She moved to Mexico to become a specialist in tequila and mezcal, now giving tours to inquisitive minds from around the globe. However, for Kami, these monumental steps are part of the process of achieving something even greater.

 

Kami’s path started with tiny punches of numbers, spitting out the register tape of life, imaginary scenarios that would one day play out in her career. Nati and I are fortunate to be this trajectory with her, our forces coming together to reach our final goal. Her innermost Matryoshka epitomizes perfection, but I see it growing rather than retreating. It’s grander than she thinks- a tremendous mass gaining momentum, advocating for change, lifting up others and building empires.

 

 

-Meg

Toast to Peru’s national hero with a tasty Peruvian pisco cocktail!

pisco cocktail, pisco, peruvian pisco, best pisco, pisco peru, san martin cocktail, craft pisco, piscologia, quebranta, acholado, cocktail recipe

 

 

In Peru, it is difficult not to stumble upon something associated with José de San Martín. From streets to provinces to statues to schools, this man’s legacy is ubiquitous. Born in Argentina, José de San Martín was a military leader who fought to liberate Argentina, Chile and Peru. However, he was notable not only for his efforts to gain independence in South America. San Martín also fought to abolish slavery, advocated for indigenous people and enacted freedom of speech in Peru.

 

José de San Martín first liberated Argentina and Chile from royalist rule. He then traveled to Peru to do the same. His efforts were successful; Peru’s independence was declared on July 28th, 1821. To this day, Peruvians celebrate Independence Day with copious amounts of pisco. Now they can add PiscoLogía’s San Martín cocktail to their repertoire.

 

Peru’s national hero died in France at the age of 72, shortly after hearing the news of Argentina’s victory against the Anglo-French blockade. To note this historical fact, Kami added a French twist to this cocktail with Chartreuse and Dubbonet.

 

Created by the master Kami Kenna, we present the San Martín cocktail to you:

 

 

San Martín, Protector of Peru 

 

2 oz Pisco Acholado

1 oz Dubonnet

Bar Spoon of Yellow Chartreuse

Garnish with grapefruit peel

Shaken, served up

 

 

 

 

 

The Bank Exchange’s All Female Lounge: A Step Toward Libation Liberation for Women

Women's Organization for National Prohibition Reform, end prohibition

Source: Library of Congress

 

If you have ever heard of pisco, you have undoubtedly heard of Duncan Nicol, the inventor of the famous, yet surreptitious Pisco Punch cocktail. A Scottish immigrant who owned the Bank Exchange bar in San Francisco from 1887-1919, Mr. Nicol helped Peruvian pisco gain fame in the USA before Prohibition. San Francisco’s wealthiest used to flock to the Bank Exchange to quaff the limey pineapple cocktail made with Peruvian brandy. During the Gold Rush, ships carrying supplies for prospectors used to stop in Peru on their way to California. They left the port of Pisco brimming with bottles of liquor with the same name, their final destination: San Francisco.

The Volstead Act forced the Bank Exchange to close its doors in 1919 and Mr. Nicol died soon after, never revealing his recipe of the Pisco Punch (Pisco). To this day, bartenders across the globe craft their own personal interpretations, making it one of the most popular pisco cocktails.

But despite our love of this flavorful drink, the invention of the Pisco Punch isn’t our favorite part of the story. The Bank Exchange wasn’t avant-garde just because of its cocktails. Duncan Nicol had opened a female-only lounge there, creating the first public drinking space in the West for upper-class women (Difford). Without chaperones in this elegant bar, women were equal to men, a tiny symbol of progress in the movement for women’s rights. We like to envision many sophisticated ladies sipping on delicious pisco cocktails there, contemplating this feminist triumph.

This piece of historical information highlights the dichotomy of women and booze during that time period. It was a complicated time for females and liquor, as many women blamed the latter for domestic abuse and other malaise in society. Some crusaded against alcohol and led pro-prohibition campaigns, such as the Anti-Saloon League of America and Women’s Christian Temperance Union (Women). On the other hand, other women visited bars and were instrumental in repealing the 18th Amendment. As Madelon Powers notes in “Women and Public Drinking, 1890-1920”, many saloons before Prohibition had an entrance for women that was accessed from the side by “either wage-earners or the wives and daughters of wage-earners who resided in the crowded tenement districts of New York, Chicago and other urban centres during America’s industrialising era” (Powers). This proves that the upper-class women who frequented the Bank Exchange weren’t anomalies; women from working-class families also visited bars before Prohibition took effect.

Additionally, as mentioned before, some women fought to repeal the 18th Amendment, seeing that corruption, violence and clandestine drinking caused by Prohibition led to many societal woes. Organizations such as the Women’s Moderation Union, Molly Pitcher’s Club, and the Women’s Organization for National Prohibition Reform were some of those groups (Women). In these examples, we can see the equivocal relationship between women and liquor on both sides of the spectrum. All these women strove to fix America’s drinking problem in one way or another. They also found their voices and mobilized to fight for their causes.

It is unfortunate that the first female-only lounge of the West was shut down shortly after its inauguration. We will never know what could have happened if Prohibition hadn’t taken place.  Perhaps the feminist movement within the liquor world would have gained more momentum. Peruvian pisco might have become more popular across the entire USA because of Duncan Nicol’s Punch. What we do know is that our 3 PiscoLogía partners can fight to be leaders in this industry because of the actions of feminists in the past. So we will celebrate those small steps, tiny cogs in the wheel of progress, knowing that we will still have a long way to go.

 

 

Sources:

Difford, Simon. “Pisco Punch Cocktail.” Difford’s Guide – for Discerning Drinkers, 7 Oct. 2014, www.diffordsguide.com/encyclopedia/553/cocktails/pisco-punch-cocktail.

“Pisco Punch.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Apr. 2019, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisco_punch.

Powers, Madelon. “Women and Public Drinking, 1890-1920 .” History Today, vol. 45, no. 2, Feb. 1995.

Women’s Museum of California. “The Women Who Repealed Prohibition.” Women’s Museum of California, 6 Dec. 2017, womensmuseum.wordpress.com/2017/12/06/the-women-who-repealed-prohibition/.

Is pisco expensive? Ask the grapes!

pisco grapes, acholado, quebranta, pisco, peruvian pisco, piscologia, best pisco, uvas pisqueras

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

What makes a bottle of liquor expensive? Where does Peruvian pisco fall on the pricing scale of spirits? Let’s discuss why Peruvian pisco is a premium spirit and how its price reflects the quality and care of what goes into every bottle.

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

The price of a bottle of liquor is influenced by its distillation methods, aging times, quality of ingredients, the labor involved in the production process and other factors. The higher the quality of ingredients or the more labor involved in making it, the more expensive it will be. For example, a meticulous distiller could use 17 pounds of potatoes to make one bottle of premium vodka. A cheaper brand might use significantly less potatoes, potatoes of lower quality or sloppy distillation methods. In other words, many factors influence price, but as a general rule, the more invested by the producers when crafting the product, the more it will cost at the liquor store.

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

Now, why is Peruvian pisco on the higher end of the scale in terms of price? The answer comes down to grapes; there are a lot of grapes in one bottle of pisco. On average, there are approximately 7.5 kilos (about 16.5 pounds) of grapes per bottle of pisco puro or pisco acholado. To make a mosto verde, you need an average about 15 kilos (33 pounds), double the amount of a regular bottle of pisco.

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

To explain this further, we made the chart below. You can see how Peruvian pisco compares to wine with regard to grapes per bottle. These are averages, as cluster size, grape size and grapevine yield vary widely between vineyards.

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

Per bottle of:
Weight of grapes Clusters Grapes # of grapevines
Wine 1.5 kilos / 3.3 lbs 10 700 1
Acholado o puro 7.5 kilos / 16.5 lbs 50 3,500 almost 4
Mosto verde 15 kilos / 33 lbs 100 7,000 7.5

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

As evident in the chart, a bottle of regular pisco has more than 3,500 grapes in it, while a mosto verde requires roughly double that amount. That’s 7,000 grapes in one bottle of liquor!

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

In Azpitia, we get an average of 2 kilos of grapes per plant. This means that one bottle of pisco puro or pisco acholado uses the fruit from almost 4 entire grape vines. Mosto verde pisco uses all the fruit from 7.5 grape vines.

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

In addition to the sheer amount of fruit that goes into one bottle, one should also consider what’s required to produce healthy plants. Viticulture is arduous work. Grape vines must be carefully tended to for an entire year before the fruit can be picked. When you add in factors like hand-harvesting & hand-pruning, growing grapes can be even more expensive and time consuming.

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

We hope the next you sip a PiscoLogía cocktail, you will have a deeper understanding of what goes into every bottle. Besides thousands of grapes, there are many factors that make Peruvian pisco premium. The taste and quality of our final product reflect its price, a quintessential high-end spirit.

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

To make these estimations, we consulted the following source:

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

Piscologia is Peruvian Pisco

Gerling, Chris. “Conversion Factors: From Vineyard to Bottle.” Conversion Factors: From Vineyard to Bottle | Viticulture and Enology, 8 Dec. 2011, grapesandwine.cals.cornell.edu/newsletters/appellation-cornell/2011-newsletters/issue-8/conversion-factors-vineyard-bottle/.

Understanding Peruvian Pisco Labels

If you have ever felt overwhelmed by the jargon on a Peruvian pisco label, you have come to the right place. In this blog post, we want to help you understand the vocabulary used to differentiate between types of pisco, pisco grapes and production zones in Peru. 

The Denomination of Origin in Peru requires that pisco labels must list 3 key elements: the type of pisco, the grape varietal(s), and where the pisco was produced. We will show you examples, but first we want to detail these 3 parts.

 
1) Type- There are 3 types of pisco:

Pisco puro– A single varietal pisco made from wine from one type of grape.

Pisco acholado– Made from more than one varietal. It can be a blend of grapes or a blend of piscos.

Pisco mosto verde– Pisco made from musts that aren’t fully fermented and sugar is still present in the juice. Mosto verde piscos tend to be more expensive because they use more grapes.

 
2) Varietal(s)- There are 8 grapes allowed in Peruvian pisco production:

Four aromatic grape varietals: Albilla, Italia, Moscatel & Torontel

Four non-aromatic grape varietals: Mollar, Negra Criolla, Quebranta & Uvina

Some producers may denote whether the grape used is aromatic or non-aromatic on their labels, although it isn’t required.

 

3) Production Location– There are 5 pisco-producing regions in Peru:

They are: Lima, Ica, Arequipa, Moquegua and Tacna (only in the valleys of Locumba, Sama and Caplina). Some labels might have more specific information about the D.O., for example the name of the valley or town where it is produced. You will see this is the case with our labels below.

 
Now, let’s see how these terms are used on our acholado label:

 

acholado, how to read a pisco label, pisco, peruvian pisco, best pisco                      acholado, how to read a pisco label, piscologia, peruvian pisco, pisco, best pisco

  1. This corresponds to the type(s) of grape used to make the pisco. Remember, “acholado” is a blend of grapes.
  2. This tells where the pisco is made. In our case, we produce in the Denomination of Origin of Lima, but more specifically, in the town of Azpitia.
  3. It is common to specify what grapes are used to make an acholado. To make our PiscoLogía acholado, we use a blend of Quebranta and Italia piscos.

 

How to read a single varietal pisco (pisco puro) label: 

quebranta, how to read a pisco label, piscologia, peruvian pisco, pisco

 

  1. Again, this tells us the type(s) of grape used to make the pisco. In the case, the “quebranta” grape is used. Pisco puro means “pure”, or only one pisco grape varietal. Many producers will provide more information about that single varietal. For example, the back of our label states: “A single variety pisco distilled from quebranta, a low aromatic red wine”.

We hope we have demystified some of the difficult vocabulary used to label Peruvian pisco bottles. Knowing these terms will give you the knowledge you need to make smart purchase the next time you are looking for PiscoLogía or another high-quality Peruvian pisco. The next step is mixing your cocktails. Don’t miss the recipe page on our website: http://piscologia.com/drink-recipes/. ¡Salud!

Is Pisco Peruvian or Chilean?

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Is Pisco Peruvian or Chilean? This question is the subject of an ongoing debate between Peru and Chile. Based on historical and etymological evidence that the first pisco was produced in Peru and because of Peru’s rich history of pisco production, we believe pisco is essentially Peruvian.

However, the objective answer to the question is: legally, pisco is both Peruvian and Chilean; both countries call their grape brandy “pisco” and both have a protected Denomination of Origin for pisco. But despite the shared name, they are very different products. Here’s a quick refresher:

  • Peruvian pisco is single-distilled to proof and nothing is added, not even water. Chilean pisco is distilled more than once and then watered down to a desired proof.
  • Peruvian pisco is aged in neutral casks and is therefore clear, while Chilean pisco is caramel colored because it’s aged in barrels.
  • Peruvian pisco is made from one or a blend of the 8 pisco-grapes grown on the coast of Peru in any of 5 the pisco-producing departments of the country. Chilean pisco is typically made from the Muscat grape (but sometimes Torontel or Pedro Jimenez grapes) in either of the country’s two pisco-producing regions, Atacama and Coquimbo.
  • Because of the differences in their distillation methods, their aging processes, and the grapes used, the final products have aromas and flavors that are very distinctive.

 

Peru and Chile have been vying for the exclusive rights to the D.O. for pisco for years. So, what’s the status of the heated conflict now? Last month the Chilean Minister of Agriculture, Antonio Walker, met with Rogers Valencia, the Minister of Culture of Peru. Mr. Walker requested that Peru recognize Chile’s D.O. to avoid clashes between Peruvian and Chilean pisco in international markets. The Peruvian minister declined. He explained that a denomination of origin cannot be shared outside its designated region because that defeats the purpose of protecting a product within a geographical area. According to the D.O. in Peru, pisco must be produced on the coast of Lima, Ica, Arequipa, Moquegua and Tacna (only in the valleys of Locumba Locumba, Sama and Caplina). Anything produced outside of those areas (for example, in Chile) cannot be considered pisco.

Peru has made great strides in protecting its D.O. for pisco. It has exclusive rights to the use the word “pisco” in 30 countries, while it shares rights with Chile in 41 countries. Chilean pisco has exclusive rights to pisco in 4 countries, but that is expected to change, as Peru is in the process of negotiating trade deals in those areas (Melgarejo).

In summary, the ongoing conflict over the Denomination of Origin for pisco will most likely continue. At PiscoLogía we are dedicated to educating the consumer about the benefits of Peruvian pisco and following the rules of the D.O. to produce a craft product of unrivaled quality. The responsibility of the D.O. regulators in Peru is to impose the strictest standards from every producer in the country. In the end, the consumers’ demand for high-quality pisco will drive the market, allowing everyone around the world to appreciate the full potential of Peruvian pisco.

 

Source:

 

Melgarejo, Víctor. “Pisco: Perú Alista Otro Triunfo Sobre Chile En La Unión Europea.” Gestion, Gestion, 12 Mar. 2019, gestion.pe/economia/pisco-peru-alista-triunfo-chile-union-europea-261079.

 

 

Salty wine, briny pisco

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PiscoLogía was recently described as deliciously briny by a discerning piscophile. We thought that this concept of brininess was interesting, so we set out to find out the origin of these salty undertones. In the end, we discovered more about how the Pacific Ocean breeze affects the flavor of our grapes and the terroir of our vineyards.

 

Many people believe that the salty sea air influences the flavor of grapes (Griffin). The reason for this comes down to simple geography. Vineyards near the coast are exposed to the tiny particles leftover from evaporated ocean spray droplets. Air currents then carry the particles from the sea, dispersing them far and wide. In the case of a vineyard, these salty remnants would fall on grape skins and in the soil (Clarke). Salt on the skins and in the environment in Azpitia would blend into the batch during production, possibly altering the flavor of the wine.

 

We have explained that to make Peruvian pisco, you first start with wine. Since our pisco is distilled only once, many characteristics of the wine are preserved in the final product. A briny, minerally wine will create a pisco with similar descriptors.

 

Our vineyards are only 4 miles from the Pacific Ocean. The ocean breeze that comes off of the coast in the early evening cools our vines while leaving a brackish trail in its path. This salty mist is just like the natural yeasts in our vineyards in Azpitia; they are floating in the air, forming the uniqueness that is our terroir.

 

Sources:

 

Clarke, Shana. “Forget the Fruit, Savor These Salty Wines.” Pastemagazine.com, 26 June 2017, 1:16pm, www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2017/06/forget-the-fruit-savor-these-salty-wines.html.

 

Griffin, Annaliese. “What Do We Mean When We Say a Wine Is Salty?” Quartzy, Quartz, 24 June 2018, qz.com/quartzy/1313189/what-do-we-mean-when-we-say-a-wine-is-salty/.

Aging Peruvian Pisco

In past posts we have discussed various steps of PiscoLogía’s production process, including harvest, fermentation and distillation. So, what else must happen before our pisco is bottled and exported? Like most spirits, pisco must rest before bottling. In fact, the regulations of the Denomination of Origin require that Peruvian pisco sit for at least 3 months in neutral casks so as to not alter its physical, chemical or organoleptic characteristics. This allows the flavors and aromas of pisco to evolve, improving the overall quality of the final product (Consejo).

 

At PiscoLogía, we prefer a maturation period of at least 6 months. If we are lucky, our pisco will sit for a couple of years before we bottle. We believe the longer it sits, the more time the flavors and aromas have to meld. Our master distiller and partner Nati explains the reasoning behind this long maturation period: “pisco aromas are extremely volatile. During the sitting stage, these aromas stabilize and blend with the liquid. The Peruvian Pisco Standard requires a resting period of at least three months, but we have our pisco sit at least 6 months to ensure the best quality product”.

 

When discussing volatility in the context of pisco production, it means that the desired aromas easily evaporate at normal temperatures. That means if a pisco isn’t properly cared for, it will lose all its aromatic qualities. A recently distilled Peruvian pisco should rest in sealed neutral casks in order to prevent evaporation and to allow the aromas to blend with the liquid.

 

In addition to melding aromas, the resting period enhances the flavor of pisco while fading out unwanted nuances caused by impurities. Because of its effect on the flavor and aroma, the resting phase of the production process is crucial in creating a balanced, high-quality craft pisco.

 

Sources:

 

Consejo Regulador de la Denominación de Origen Pisco. “Reglamento De La Denominación De Origen Pisco.” www.indecopi.gob.pe/documents/20195/200722/6+Reglamento_DO-PISCO.pdf/a2259836-69e6-4c8c-b403-f8c3c38f7039.