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Vineyards in Peru? Thank the Humboldt Current!

Peruvian desert, Ica, wineries in Peru, Humboldt current, climate Peru, Peruvian pisco

Desert along the Peruvian coastline

 

Most of the world’s premium wine production takes place between the 30th and 50th parallels of the Southern and Northern Hemispheres, where temperate conditions are conducive to grape growing. In these areas, grapevines generally thrive in warm, dry locations with distinct seasonal changes. The climates found between these parallels fall into 3 categories: Mediterranean, continental, and maritime. For example, the Saale-Unstrut wine region in Germany is located at 51° N and has a continental climate, while Tuscany, at 43.77° N, has a Mediterranean climate.

 

Tropical zones are defined as the part of the Earth’s surface between the Tropic of Cancer (23.5° N) and the Tropic of Capricorn (23.4° S). Growing grapes in tropical regions can be problematic for many reasons. It is widely known that the tropics are characterized by heavy rain, humidity, and high temperatures, three conditions that promote various diseases in vines, such as mold and mildew. Moreover, while cool nights promote acidity and balance in grapes in temperate zones, in tropical regions, minimum nightly temperatures fall no lower than about 71.6 °F (22°C), making it challenging to achieve that same roundness. Finally, because of the year-round sweltering heat in the tropics, it is difficult to complete a period of dormancy during the winter. Dormancy is crucial because it allows the vine to rest and conserve energy, in preparation for the next season.

 

Azpitia is located at 12° S in the tropics, so theoretically, it should be extremely difficult to grow grapes there, or anywhere else in Peru. So how are we able to produce healthy pisco grapes in this area of the world? The answer lies in an oceanographic phenomenon called the Humboldt Current.

 

The Humboldt Current is a cold ocean current that flows north along the western coast of South America. The current extends from southern Chile to northern Peru, bringing frigid waters from the south, cooling the ocean & creating dry, chilled air, which changes the tropical climate. This is why the Peruvian coastline is so barren. Where a dense jungle would normally lie, sand dunes and cacti line the coasts of Peru, creating very favorable wine-making conditions, similar to what you might see in the high-desert vineyards of Washington State.  Days are hot and dry, but nights are relatively cool in Azpitia, creating the perfect conditions for our vines. Because of this fascinating phenomenon, we can grow grapes in optimal conditions and produce the high-quality wine that we distill to make PiscoLogía!

 

Enjoying Peruvian Pisco in Okinawa: A Historical Perspective

pisco in japan, pisco in okinawa, maurice dudley, piscologia, peruvian pisco, blue habu, pisco cocktails, bars in okinawa

Maurice Dudley From Blue Habu

 

PiscoLogía Pisco Acholado recently reached the shores of Okinawa and into the hands of Blue Habu Trade Group. This newly founded relationship with Blue Habu is not only an important milestone for both parties; it also symbolizes a deep-rooted cultural bond between Okinawa and Peru.

 

The connection between Peru and Okinawa dates back to the early 1900’s, when vast quantities of Okinawans left their homes in search of a better life. Many settled in South America. In Peru, they formed communities in the coastal areas, where they cultivated agricultural fields to provide for their families. This influx of Okinawans enriched the Peruvian culture in innumerable ways, including the diversification of food and the creation of “Nikkei”, the fusion of Japanese and Peruvian cuisine.

 

Currently, the alliance between Okinawa and Peru remains just as strong, manifested in the exchange of goods and movement of people. Because of this historical significance, we at PiscoLogía are especially proud to be working with Blue Habu Trade Group.

 

So, if you have the pleasure of visiting Okinawa, be sure to get your hands on some PiscoLogía and reflect on this very important part of history!

 

 

Sources:

Mitchell, John. “Welcome Home, Okinawa”. Japan Times. 22 October 2016.

Hatlestad, Kari, “Peruvian Food: the Social and Cultural Origins of Peruvian Food” (2017). University Honors Theses. Paper 367.