PiscoLogía’s Pisco Certificate Course Recognized as a Top Trend in the Spirits Industry in 2021

Spirits Trends 2021

PRESS RELEASE

Promoting Innovation and Change were the Criteria used to Select Trends for the Upcoming Year

PiscoLogía’s certificate course was recognized as a “cocktail trend to watch in 2021” by the Spirits Business, the only international trade magazine and website in the world solely dedicated to the spirits industry. Highlighting innovative educational trends in the on-trade in 2021, the article states: While bartenders can now undertake specialist spirits education programmes, including an online course dedicated to pisco, venues looking to increase their revenue streams have also embraced the opportunity to educate consumers through cocktail‐ making masterclasses”.

Founder and lead Instructional Designer of the course, Meg McFarland commented: “Our goal in creating the certificate program was to help the industry community through education, but being recognized as top innovators in the spirits industry is a delightful bonus. We hope this trend continues and those in the industry has the resources they need to grow during this difficult time”.

Launched in October 2020, the Pisco Certificate Course is a comprehensive program for spirits lovers, professionals in the service industry, sommeliers and beyond. The interactive and immersive curriculum teaches vocabulary and pronunciation, varieties and production zones, the history of pisco, how to craft pisco cocktails and much more.

For questions or to receive free access to the course, please write to: info@piscocertificate.com.

 

About PiscoLogía

PiscoLogía Quebranta, a single-variety Peruvian pisco, won a gold medal at the Women’s Wine and Spirits Awards in London in 2019. PiscoLogía Acholado, a blend of Italia and Quebranta piscos, was awarded a gold medal at the SIP Awards in California. Both piscos are crafted in the Denomination of Origin of Lima (Azpitia) by Master Distiller Nati Gordillo.

PiscoLogía is available in the USA through Craft Distillers, in Canada through the Unknown Agency and in Japan through The Blue Habu Trade Group.

 

Myth #12- Acholado piscos must be made from a mix of aromatic and non-aromatic grapes

This is the 12th in a series mythbusters to clarify misconceptions about Peruvian pisco!

 

Acholados can be made from a blend of any of the 8 grapes permitted by the D.O. in Peru. The blend does not need to contain both aromatic and non-aromatic grapes.

 

Another myth about pisco that requires clarification is the notion that an acholado must be made from a blend of at least one aromatic grape and one non-aromatic grape. To address this myth, we turned to Pepe Moquillaza, Liquid Story Teller, brand Ambassador and maestro pisquero, who stated: “traditionally an acholado was made from Quebranta and a mix of aromatic grapes. However, this wasn’t enforced in the legislation of the Denomination of Origin, so that requirement is no longer. Now you can mix grapes, fermented must or piscos of any of the 8 grape types permitted by the D.O.”

Here are the D.O. rules for acholados:

4.3 Pisco acholado is obtained from a mix of:

  • Pisco grapes, aromatic and non-aromatic
  • Musts of aromatic and non-aromatic pisco grapes
  • Completely fermented fresh musts (wine) of aromatic and non-aromatic pisco grapes.
  • Piscos made from aromatic and non-aromatic pisco grapes.

 

And just a reminder, those pisco grapes are: Quebranta, Negra Criolla, Mollar, Uvina (non-aromatic) and Albilla, Italia, Torontel and Moscatel (aromatic).

So there you have it- one can find all types of acholado piscos in Peru, and blends made from solely non-aromatic or aromatic grapes are permitted. The end result in the bottle comes down to the vineyard and the preferences of the master distiller.

Piuchiu, the Pre-Columbian Peruvian Distillate

Pisco came to existence after King Philip IV prohibited the importation of Peruvian wine in Spain in 1641, forcing locals to distill their fermented grape juice into clear brandy. In “Pisco: its Name, its History”, Gonzalo Gutiérrez highlights how pisco production increased after this restriction. According to Gutiérrez, the Jesuit Order was largely responsible for the significant brandy production in Peru, especially in Pisco and Nazca (51). Since that time, our favorite distilled spirit has become one of Peru’s most significant cultural symbols.

However, while the Jesuits and colonizers are responsible for pisco’s growth, distillation existed long before the arrival of foreigners to Peru. According to T. Fairley in The Early History of Distillation, Peruvians were distilling native materials before colonization. He states: “In the 16th century, the Spaniards found the Peruvians using an apparatus of this kind…It is probable that the Peruvians used this apparatus long before the date of the Spanish conquest. ”(560).  The image below depicts the still described by Fairley (561):

pre columbian still, peru distillation

So what were native Peruvians distilling with this fascinating contraption? According to Fairley, piuchiu was the spirit of choice, made from fermented corn or yuca (known as chicha). Chicha is heavily consumed in Peru, especially in the Andes, where chicherías provide locals with endless supplies of the tangy corn ferment. A red plastic bag tied to a stick marks the entrance of a chichería, typically inside someone’s adobe home.

While fermented chicha is ubiquitous now, oddly you won’t find piuchiu in Peru. Somehow this distilling custom went out of practice. So how was piuchiu made? After fermenting the corn or yuca, the native Peruvians placed the fermented liquor, “into a deep earthen pot, having a hole in the side near the top, through which passes a wooden gutter of the form shown, connecting the receiver. Over the top a pan, filled with cold water and luted to the pot with clay, is placed. This acts as the condenser and the spirit flows along the groove into the bottle or receiver” (561).

piuchiu, distillation peru, pisco history Chart depicting ancient distilled spirits in various countries. Maize and manioc were the fermented base used to make Puichiu.

Another more rudimentary variation of a still was documented by Édouard Charton and illustrated by Édouard Riou in Le Tour Du Monde: Nouveau Journal Des Voyages. As seen below, the fermented liquid was boiled in a ceramic urn. Sheepskins were then hung over the boiling pot to catch the vapors. Once wet, the sheepskins were wrung out to extract the alcohol as it accumulated.

 

Ancient distillation Peru

In summary, while colonizers should receive credit for widespread distillation in Peru’s pisco-making history, T. Fairley’s research demonstrates Peruvians were distilling native ingredients before their arrival. In the end, this information is further proof of Peru’s diverse history, culture and delightful culinary portfolio.

 

 

Works Consulted:

Charton, Edouard, 1807-1890. Le Tour Du Monde: Nouveau Journal Des Voyages. Paris: Libraire de L. Hachette,

Fairley, T. The Early History of Distillation. Harrison and Sons, 1907.

Gutiérrez, Gonzalo. Pisco: Its Name, Its History. Editorial Académica Española, 2020.

English Translation of Revelatory Research about Pisco by Ambassador Gutiérrez Reinel is released

Press Release

 

“The Misleading Name of Pisco Elqui” Provides Irrefutable Evidence of the Peruvian Origins of Pisco

Meg McFarland announces the release of the English translation of the article “The Misleading Name of Pisco Elqui”. This comprehensive work by Ambassador Gonzalo Gutiérrez Reinel covers the Peruvian origins of pisco and the change of name of a town in Chile in the 1930s. Its aim is to increase awareness of the historical background and cultural diversity of pisco from Peru, “I am delighted to present this work in English about the origins of pisco to the international community, not only to clarify misconceptions, but also to spread the word about the rich history and cultural heritage of Peru’s national beverage”, said Gutiérrez.

By analyzing various geographical, cartographic, legal and historical documents, “The Misleading Name of Pisco Elqui”, refutes controversial claims made about the origins of pisco by Chilean historians. Gutiérrez confirms that the town of “La Unión”, the supposed sociocultural hub of the so-called Chilean pisco culture, was swiftly renamed to “Pisco-Elqui” in 1936 to circumvent regulations on the use of geographical names to designate spirits in the US. “The findings corroborate that the name change of the town “La Unión” was not a response to a sociocultural evolution, as stated by various researchers, but rather to a mala fide trade scheme. On the other hand, the word “pisco” existed in Peru for many years before the arrival of the Europeans to America in the XV century, undergoing an etymological transformation from the word “bird” to eventually refer to the clear spirit”, said the renowned pisco researcher.

The Ambassador has produced many articles on the historical and cultural significance of pisco from Peru, but this announcement marks the first release of a version in English. “It was an honor to work side by side with Ambassador Gutiérrez on this translation project of the most epochal range and quality,” says Meg McFarland, translator of “The Misleading Name of Pisco Elqui”. She continues, “Providing this valuable information in English will help reach a greater pool of readers about the origins and history of pisco”.

The article can be found at the following link:

Pisco Certificate Course-Misleading Name of Pisco Elqui

Misleading Name of Pisco Elqui

 

About Ambassador Gutiérrez Reinel

Gonzalo Gutierrez is the current ambassador of Peru in Belgium, Luxembourg and the European Union. He has also been the Minister of Foreign Affairs in Peru and the Peruvian Ambassador in China and for the United Nations. For a long time he has researched and published about the historical and evidence of the Peruvian origins of pisco. He will soon release a book in English on the subject.

 

About Pisco

Pisco from Peru is the oldest grape brandy of the Americas. Distilled in the tradition of ancestral firewater (eau-de-vie, brandy), pisco is a clear, unaged spirit made from 100% grapes. According to the IWSC (International Wine and Spirits Competition), pisco is one of the 5 biggest spirits trends in the world, as seen in the rising popularity of the spirit in the 2019 competition.

All the Peruvian Pisco Grapes- Quebranta, Italia and 6 Others

The 4 aromatic pisco grapes are Albilla, Torontel, Italia and Moscatel. The 4 non-aromatic grapes are Quebranta, Uvina, Mollar and Negra Criolla. But before we explore each variety, first let’s talk about the 2 categories of pisco grapes: aromatic and non-aromatic. While the latter categorization might imply that some piscos lack aromas, it should be clarified that all varieties of Peruvian pisco have very expressive aromas. This often creates confusion for people not familiar with Peruvian pisco. They understandably expect a “non-aromatic” pisco to not have any aromas.

All the Peruvian pisco grapes have highly aromatic qualities because of production methods required by the Denomination of Origin in Peru. First, the single distillation method helps bring out the unique aromatic profile of each grape variety. Then, resting in neutral casks enhances aromas while preserving the pisco’s original identity. This is different than spirits that age in barrels whose flavors and aromas are altered by wood. Please watch the video below for more information.

 

 

What do Acholado, Pisco Puro and Mosto Verde Mean?

In lesson 2, you will learn about the differences between the 3 types of piscos: pisco puro, pisco acholado & mosto verde. What differentiates one type of pisco from another depends on the grapes, not in the varieties used to make them, but in the way they are used.

Pisco puro is made from one grape. For example, Quebranta is a grape used to make Peruvian pisco, just like Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay are grapes used to make wine. So, pisco puro de quebranta is a pisco made from just one variety, the quebranta grape.

Acholado means blend. An acholado can be made from a blend of grapes or a blend of piscos, which means a distiller can combine the grapes before distillation or the piscos after distillation. In the case of PiscoLogía, our master distiller Nati blends Italia and Quebranta piscos before bottling. This allows her to create the perfect formula in each batch once the flavors and aromas have melded during the resting phase.

Finally, a mosto verde pisco is made from musts that aren’t fully fermented, such that the yeasts haven’t completely converted all of the sugars from the grape juice into wine. This results in mosto verdes having a more silky texture and are more aromatic.

 

 

 

Pisco Certificate Course and & PiscoLogia- What is Pisco?

In lesson 1 of the Pisco Certificate Course, you will learn about the pisco-making process from grapes to glass, the ABV levels permitted by the D.O. in Peru and how many grapes are in a bottle of pisco.

The rich history of pisco shows in the traditions performed throughout the entire production process, starting with agricultural and spiritual practices in the vineyards and ending when the pisco is consumed. Harvest of pisco grapes happens in Fall in Peru, typically in March or April. The ripe berries are plucked from the vines, giving the master distiller the raw materials needed to craft the perfect batch. The grapes are destemmed and crushed and maceration may or may not occur. With the help of yeasts, the sugar converts the grape juice to alcohol and the juice becomes wine, ready for distillation. Once distillation has converted the wine to pisco, the brandy must rest a minimum of 3 months in neutral vessels such as stainless steel or fiberglass. This makes pisco completely transparent and unaltered, allowing you to fully appreciate the original identity of the spirit. After resting, it can be bottled and is ready for consumption.

 

 

How to Make Vegan Pisco Sour with Kami Kenna!

As a bartender, Kami has made cocktails to meet all types of dietary needs and preferences. In order to accommodate vegans and consumers iffy on eggs in their drinks, it was necessary to perfect a vegan pisco sour recipe. The purpose of the egg is to add texture and to dry out the cocktail. Whether or not you are vegan, or just turned off by raw eggs, you will learn how to ditch the egg and make an equally tasty and textured cocktail! Learn how to make a vegan pisco sour in this video!

 

Pairing Pisco with Chuncho Chocolate

pisco flavor wheel, pisco tasting wheel

Because Peruvian pisco is made from wine and it is so aromatic and flavorful, it pairs especially well with food. In this post, we have chosen a quintessential Peruvian food, Chuncho chocolate, and combined it with pisco to show you what a perfect harmony of food and drink looks like and tastes like.

Chuncho is a variety of theobroma cacao and is considered to be the “center of origin” for all cacao flavors and aromas, with flavors like mandarin, soursop, peach, banana, and jasmine. Chuncho hails from La Convención in Cusco, Peru – precisely where Machu Picchu is located.

Fascinatingly, it is suspected that the cacao pods manifested attractive aromas to allure consumer animals and to ensure repeat consumers it had to deliver a flavorful pulp. This occurred to facilitate seed dispersal and the continuation of the plant. Pre-Inca and the Incas alike consumed the flavorful pulp and only slightly roasted the beans. In fact, Chuncho farmers to this day still do.

Since the flavors in the pulp are imparted to the beans and ultimately to the finished chocolate, the long-standing selection process of the Chuncho cacao variety makes it one of the most prized.

Out of 40 flavors and aromas identified in Chuncho cacao, twenty nine of them mimic those of known fruit and flower or spice species such as: mandarin, soursop, custard apple, cranberry, peach, banana, inga, mango, nut, mint, cinnamon, jasmine, rose and lily.

If you look at the pisco flavor wheel in the image above, the flavor and aroma crossover with pisco is uncanny. Based on the shared flavors and aromas, it is very clear that this would be an exciting pairing to make. While chocolate made from Chuncho cacao may be exclusive and hard to find, any high quality chocolate will be suitable to carry out the pairing.

The flavors and aromas of pisco are fruity and flowery, mainly due to the presence of terpenes, esters, and aldehydes that come from the varieties of grapes used in the wine production and are also produced during the fermentation and the distillation processes. In pisco, forty-two olfactory attributes have been detected, highlighting the complexity of the product.

Channeling back to the tasting lesson, taste the chocolate and the pisco slowly and studiously. We recommend you alternate a small bite of chocolate with a small sip of pisco, taking care to give your palette and brain ample time to formulate an analysis. When pairing with food, there are times when the distillate is enhanced due to the pairing and there are times when it is not. The takeaway is the analysis and what you have learned about both of the tasting specimens individually and together – even if the pairing is a fail.

Because pisco is an unaged spirit with seemingly infinite variations from the grape, the growing year, the producer, and production methods, pairing food with pisco can be such an adventure. Pairing is yet another tool to add to your arsenal of studying the spirit.

We hope you can use the culmination of your experience with Peruvian pisco to experiment with pairing, try pairing it with some of your favorite dishes!

スーパーコピー ブランドコピー コピーブランド ロレックス スーパーコピー ロレックス コピー パテックフィリップ コピー パテックフィリップ スーパーコピー モンクレール スーパーコピー モンクレール コピー モンクレール ダウン コピー シュプリーム スーパーコピー シュプリーム コピー ウブロ スーパーコピー ウブロ コピー