Did Victor Morris Invent the Pisco Sour?

who invented pisco sour, victor morris, original pisco sour

Victor Vaughen Morris often receives credit for inventing the pisco sour. While the cocktail became wildly popular in the 1920’s thanks to the American expatriate, evidence shows that pisco sours existed years before Morris began serving them at his bar in downtown Lima.

In his blog post “The Origin of the Pisco Sour”, Nico Vera shares a recipe from a cookbook published in Lima in 1903, The Nuevo Manual de Cocina a la Criolla. Made with “egg white, a glass of Pisco, a teaspoon of fine sugar, and a few drops of lime……all of this beaten in a cocktail shaker” (Nuevo), this unnamed creole cocktail is strikingly similar to the pisco sour served by Morris. Because this recipe began circulating in 1903, this could prove the pisco sour was being made in Peru long before the 1920’s.

We may never know who invented the pisco sour. However, its popularity hasn’t lost momentum since the 1920’s. Recently recognized as one of the most popular cocktails in the world (Wolinksi), the pisco sour continues to win over discerning drinkers around the globe.

Check out Kami’s pisco sour and three vegan pisco sour recipes on our blog.

 

 

Works Consulted:

“Nuevo Manual De Cocina a La Criolla – 1903.” Edited by S.E. Ledesma, Issuu, 20 Feb. 2013, issuu.com/davidpino7/docs/recetario1903.

Vera, Nico. “The Origin of the Pisco Sour .” Pisco Trail, 9 Dec. 2013, www.piscotrail.com/2013/12/09/culinary-history/the-origin-of-the-pisco-sour/.

“Victor Vaughen Morris.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 25 Mar. 2019, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Vaughen_Morris.

Wolinski, Cat, and Helena Yankovska. “The 50 Most Popular Cocktails in the World (UPDATED 2019).” VinePair, 31 May 2019, vinepair.com/articles/50-most-popular-cocktails-world-2017/?fbclid=IwAR2QLQXeh5Vw_F1YaaUpyDlhu9Nc9I4HdaOD7dedVi-3YazgD-BiODCXEl4.

Create a Pisco Sour Without the Egg!

vegan pisco sour, pisco sour without egg

Credit: Blue Habu

 

The unappetizing odor, fear of food-borne illnesses and adherence to a vegan diet are reasons many avoid raw eggs in their cocktails. The traditional pisco sour recipe relies on egg whites to create its creamy foam. However, these 3 alternatives use aquafaba, Ms. Better’s Bitters Miraculous Foamer and organic soy milk to create a similar texture.

 

First, Tara Duggan from the San Francisco Chronicle uses aquafaba:
  • 2 oz. Pisco
  • 1 oz. aquafaba, or the drained water from a can of unsalted garbanzo beans
  • 1 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons sugar or ¾ oz. simple syrup

 

Nico from Pisco Trail works with Ms. Better’s Bitters Miraculous Foamer in lieu of egg whites:
  • 2 oz. PiscoLogía Pisco Quebranta
  • 1 oz. Lime juice
  • 1 oz. Simple syrup
  • 1/2 Dropper Ms. Better’s Bitters Miraculous Foamer

 

Maurice Dudley from Blue Habu in Okinawa uses organic soy milk:
  • 2 oz. PiscoLogía Pisco Acholado
  • 1 oz. Shiquasa liquer
  • 1 oz. Gum syrup
  • 1 oz. Organic soy milk

 

*For all recipes, place all ingredients in a shaker without ice. Shake for 30 seconds. Add ice and shake again. Strain into chilled glass. When foam rises, garnish with 3 drops of bitters.

 

Pro-tip- If you’re making a maracuyá sour, passionfruit makes a natural foam. Vigorously shake 1 oz. of pure passionfruit juice with pisco and simple syrup. You will be pleasantly surprised by the natural froth that forms from the juice.

Leave us a comment if you find a favorite substitute for eggs whites for your pisco sours!

 

 

Sources:

Blue Habu Trade Group. “The 4-30”. https://web.facebook.com/bluehabutrade/. January 20, 2018.

 

Duggan, Tara. “Recipe: Aquafaba Pisco Sour Cocktail.” SFChronicle.com, San Francisco Chronicle, 9 Mar. 2016, www.sfchronicle.com/recipes/article/Recipe-Aquafaba-Pisco-Sour-Cocktail-6880706.php.

 

Vera, Nico. “Vegan Pisco Sour .” Pisco Trail, 2 Feb. 2019, www.piscotrail.com/2019/02/02/cocktails/vegan-pisco-sour/.

Myth#4- Quebranta is the best pisco for a pisco sour

This is the 4th post of a series of mythbusters to clarify misconceptions about Peruvian pisco.

 

pisco sour, pisco cocktail, peruvian pisco, piscologia

 

We think Acholado is the best pisco for a pisco sour.

 

Contrary to the belief in Peru that pisco sours should be made with Quebranta pisco, we prefer a sour made with pisco Acholado. It’s even better when the Acholado is blended with an aromatic grape like Italia. The floral, fruity notes of the aromatic variety pair well with the citrus in the cocktail.  

In a recent blog post we discussed the benefits of highlighting the characteristics of each pisco type when mixing cocktails. To do this, Kami envisions the 8 pisco varieties on a spectrum, drawing a parallel between their flavors and their sense of warmth. To her, the more aromatic the pisco, the cooler it is: “I love an Acholado or one of the aromatics for a pisco sour. I tend to think of Quebranta as warm, while Italia and Torontel are cool. I like my cool/floral/bright piscos with citrus and the “warm” Quebranta on its own or mixed into a Capitán or another booze-forward classic like a Negroni”.

With this advice from Kami, we encourage you to experiment by making pisco sours with different types of pisco. We are confident that you will agree- the floral, fruity notes of an Acholado work best with the sweetness and acidity of Peru’s most iconic cocktail.  

Myth #2: The 3-1-1 recipe is the best for pisco sour

This is the 2nd post of a series of mythbusters to clarify misconceptions about Peruvian pisco.

 

  pisco cocktail, pisco sour, piscologia, peruvian pisco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We think the best recipe for the pisco sour is:  2 oz. Peruvian pisco + 1 oz. lime juice + 1/2 oz. simple syrup

 

Many people claim that the traditional 3-1-1 recipe (3 oz. pisco + 1 oz. simple syrup + 1 oz. lime juice) is the best for the pisco sour. However, we believe less booze is better for the most classic Peruvian cocktail.

When consulted about the 3-1-1 recipe, our favorite award-winning bartender Kami said: “3 ounces of pisco is too much booze. I like to use only 2 ounces of pisco in my sours”. The alcohol in a cocktail serves to provide a nice buzz, but it’s most enjoyed when it pairs well with the flavors of your drink. In the case of a pisco sour, you want the pisco to be in harmony with the sweetness of the simple syrup and the acidity of the limes, not overpower them. 

Kami elaborated on the subject further, saying “you also need to take in account your location and the origin of your ingredients when making cocktails. Peruvian limes are very acidic, so in Peru, I use the 2-1-1 recipe. In the USA or Canada, the regular lime isn’t as pungent, so I use 1 ounce of lime juice and 1/2 oz of simple syrup, creating a 2:1 ratio of sour to sweet”.

One must also consider the alcohol content of a cocktail to drink responsibly.  A cocktail with 3 shots of liquor will put a woman of average weight at or above .08 percent of blood alcohol concentration (the legal limit to drive in Washington State and Canada). The sugar and lime will mask the high level of alcohol, so you may not realize just how much you are consuming as you enjoy the smooth, delicious cocktail. Why not enjoy your pisco sour with less booze to slow down the pace of drinking? It is safer and better for your health.  

On that safety note, here is Kami’s classic pisco sour recipe, to be adjusted according to your geographical location:  

 
Pisco Sour
 

2 oz PiscoLogía Pisco

1/2 oz simple syrup

1 oz fresh lime juice

1 egg white  

 
Dry shake, shake again with ice & vigor, serve up, Angostura bitters

 

Pairing your favorite Peruvian food with PiscoLogía

Peruvian pisco is an unaged wine that is distilled one time. We believe single distillation brings out the characteristics of each grape varietal, whereas a double or triple distillation might mask important flavors and aromas.

Because Peruvian pisco is made from wine and it is so aromatic and flavorful, it pairs especially well with food. In this post, we have chosen some of our favorite Peruvian dishes and combined them with signature PiscoLogía cocktails to create a perfect harmony of food and drink. The next time you eat Peruvian cuisine, use this as a guide to enhance your culinary experience. For details about each cocktail recipe, please visit: https://piscologia.com/drink-recipes/.

 

Picarones Doughnuts made from squash and sweet potato. Served with chancaca (molasses) syrup.

Pair with: PiscoLogía Quebranta in a snifter

Paring notes: In this combination, the aromas of caramelized banana of our Quebranta pisco accentuate the sweetness of the molasses syrup.

 

Turrón Doña Pepa This dessert consists of chancaca syrup slathered between buttery layers of anise cookies. It is topped with generous amounts of sprinkles.

Pair with: Clover Club Peruano

Pairing notes: The raspberry undertones of this cocktail complement the fruity chancaca syrup and the sweet, crumbly cookies.

 

Choros a la chalaca Mussels stuffed with spicy peppers, onions, corn and tomato.

choros a la chalaca, quebranta, cocktail pairing food, peruvian food pairing, piscologia, peruvian pisco

Pair with: Piña Asada Fix

Pairing notes: The combination of sweet and tart in this cocktail cut through the intense flavors of the onion and spicy pepper chalaca salsa.

 

Rocoto relleno- Spicy pepper (rocoto) stuffed with meat, potatoes and vegetables. It is topped with cheese and baked. Usually served with scalloped potatoes.

rocoto relleno, quebranta, cocktail pairing food, peruvian food pairing, piscologia, peruvian pisco, pisco punch, pisco sour

Pair with: Pisco Punch

Pairing notes: This limey/pineapple punch is refreshing but hardy, matching the robust flavors of the meat and cheese in this dish.

 

Ceviche- A seafood dish typically made from fresh raw fish cured in lime juice and spiced with chili peppers, chopped onions, salt, and cilantro.

ceviche, chilcano, quebranta, cocktail pairing food, peruvian food pairing, piscologia, peruvian pisco

Pair with: Chilcano

Pairing notes: We think Peru’s most iconic dish should accompany Peru’s most iconic cocktail. The gingery acidic flavor of this cocktail pair beautifully with this spicy citrus dish.

 

Lomo saltado- A fusion of Peruvian/Chinese food. This stir fry dish combines sirloin, spicy peppers, onions, tomatoes and soy sauce.

lomo saltado, quebranta, cocktail pairing food, peruvian food pairing, piscologia, peruvian pisco, peruvian cuisine, pisco cocktails

Pair with: No Tea, No Shade

Pairing notes: The tannins from the tea and bitterness of the Aperol pair well with the sweet, spicy, savory flavors of this meaty dish.

 

Ají de gallina– A creamy, spicy chicken dish. Ají de gallina is similar to Thai curry, but the Peruvian version uses evaporated milk instead of coconut milk and ají amarillo peppers instead of curry paste.

aji de gallina, pisco pairing, peruvian pisco, piscologia, pisco sour, cocktail food pairing

Pair with: Pisco sour

Pairing notes: Another quintessential Peruvian dish that is best paired with a truly “Peruvian” cocktail. This creamy dish needs some acidity from the lime juice to create balance, while the foamy egg-white layer matches the velvety texture of the pepper sauce.

 

 

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