Building a Business- Creating a product, brand and plan

ladies of restaurants, piscologia, pisco UK

We are still buzzing after an online session with Ladies of Restaurants, a UK-based collective for women working in restaurants, hotels, bars and all areas of the food & drink sector!  L.O.R. (Ladies of Restaurants) leads positive action that addresses the gender gap in the hospitality industry.

While this meeting has ended, stay tuned to our social media and blog for information about upcoming events. Here is the description of our “Building a Business- Creating a Product, Brand and Plan”:

If you have been sitting on an idea for a product, place or thing but a little too scared to make the move – than this might be the session for you.

Are you in the middle of launching a new product, tired of something you have been shifting for a while and need a little PUSH to keep going? Than this might be the session for you.

Meet Kami, Meg & Nati – the trio of women behind the pisco brand; @piscologiapisco / Meg founded the brand back in 2008, to bring the beautiful spirit to the bars, shop shelves and palates of a global audience. Kami won a trip to Peru following a bartending competition, joined forces with Meg and Nati, and never looked back. And Nati, well without Nati there would be no pisco. She is the master distiller, sommelier and vigneron.

So what does it take to build a brand? To make a product? And what IS pisco? All of this and more will be discovered in our one our session with the team behind Piscologia.

This is a FREE event for Patrons / Log into the Patron Portal to register.

£10 FOR NON-PATRONS + ALL ATTENDEES RECEIVE COMPLIMENTARY ACCESS TO THE PISCOLOGIA PISCO COURSE (VALUED AT $60)

Click our linktree to register!

For more information, please visit:  https://www.ladiesofrestaurants.com/

Nati Gordillo de PiscoLogía recibe premio como “destiladora artesana del año” por Craft Spirits Berlín

Gordillo fue seleccionada como la mejor del mundo entre un grupo de destiladoras de productos artesanales, sostenibles y de origen regional

 

La Maestra Destiladora y socia de PiscoLogía, Nati Gordillo, fue designada “destiladora artesana del año” por Craft Spirits Berlín, el principal evento de Europa para destilados artesanales. Destacando el terruño único de Azpitia, Perú, y los meticulosos métodos artesanales de Nati, Craft Spirits Berlín declaró: “Esto tiene que ser el paraíso: laderas verdes y fértiles con vides en la parte superior, un microclima suave, protegido por las altas montañas que se abren directamente detrás ellas… ..Desde el cultivo de la vid hasta la vendimia, el prensado de la uva, posteriormente la destilación y el embotellado y etiquetado, la responsabilidad es de Nati Gordillo ”.

 

“Para mí, la elaboración de pisco es una forma de vida. El concepto de artesanía comienza en el viñedo y termina cuando se consume PiscoLogía. Es increíble ser reconocida por la atención especial que le doy a cada lote de PiscoLogía y estar más conectado con la comunidad mundial de quienes comparten los mismos valores y principios que yo ”, afirmó la Sra. Gordillo.

 

La directora de educación de la marca, la socia Kami Kenna, comentó: “El premio no sólo reconoció el fenomenal trabajo de Nati como Maestra Destiladora, sino que también enfatizó el “poder de las mujeres” detrás del producto. Ha llegado el momento de que la fuerza de las mujeres productoras, especialmente de las minorías, sea reconocida en la industria de las bebidas espirituosas. Estamos muy orgullosas de Nati y del increíble pisco que hace. ¡Este hito es un paso adelante para todas las mujeres!

El concurso anual Craft Spirits Berlín, el concurso de destilados artesanales más famoso de Europa, permite a los productores exhibir sus destilados artesanales, vinos fortificados, refrescos y jarabes hechos a mano en el escenario mundial. Para obtener más información, visite: https://www.craftspiritsberlin.de/en/

 

Sobre PiscoLogía

PiscoLogía Quebranta, un pisco peruano monovarietal, ganó una medalla de oro en los premios Women’s Wine and Spirits Awards en Londres en 2019. PiscoLogía Acholado, una mezcla de piscos Italia y Quebranta, recibió una medalla de oro en los Premios SIP en California. Ambos piscos son elaborados en la Denominación de Origen de Lima (Azpitia) por la Maestra Destiladora, Nati Gordillo.

PiscoLogía está disponible en EE. UU. A través de Craft Distillers, en Canadá a través de Unknown Agency y en Japón a través de The Blue Habu Trade Group.

PiscoLogía’s Pisco Certificate Course Recognized as a Top Trend in the Spirits Industry in 2021

Spirits Trends 2021

PRESS RELEASE

Promoting Innovation and Change were the Criteria used to Select Trends for the Upcoming Year

PiscoLogía’s certificate course was recognized as a “cocktail trend to watch in 2021” by the Spirits Business, the only international trade magazine and website in the world solely dedicated to the spirits industry. Highlighting innovative educational trends in the on-trade in 2021, the article states: While bartenders can now undertake specialist spirits education programmes, including an online course dedicated to pisco, venues looking to increase their revenue streams have also embraced the opportunity to educate consumers through cocktail‐ making masterclasses”.

Founder and lead Instructional Designer of the course, Meg McFarland commented: “Our goal in creating the certificate program was to help the industry community through education, but being recognized as top innovators in the spirits industry is a delightful bonus. We hope this trend continues and those in the industry has the resources they need to grow during this difficult time”.

Launched in October 2020, the Pisco Certificate Course is a comprehensive program for spirits lovers, professionals in the service industry, sommeliers and beyond. The interactive and immersive curriculum teaches vocabulary and pronunciation, varieties and production zones, the history of pisco, how to craft pisco cocktails and much more.

For questions or to receive free access to the course, please write to: info@piscocertificate.com.

 

About PiscoLogía

PiscoLogía Quebranta, a single-variety Peruvian pisco, won a gold medal at the Women’s Wine and Spirits Awards in London in 2019. PiscoLogía Acholado, a blend of Italia and Quebranta piscos, was awarded a gold medal at the SIP Awards in California. Both piscos are crafted in the Denomination of Origin of Lima (Azpitia) by Master Distiller Nati Gordillo.

PiscoLogía is available in the USA through Craft Distillers, in Canada through the Unknown Agency and in Japan through The Blue Habu Trade Group.

 

Piuchiu, the Pre-Columbian Peruvian Distillate

Pisco came to existence after King Philip IV prohibited the importation of Peruvian wine in Spain in 1641, forcing locals to distill their fermented grape juice into clear brandy. In “Pisco: its Name, its History”, Gonzalo Gutiérrez highlights how pisco production increased after this restriction. According to Gutiérrez, the Jesuit Order was largely responsible for the significant brandy production in Peru, especially in Pisco and Nazca (51). Since that time, our favorite distilled spirit has become one of Peru’s most significant cultural symbols.

However, while the Jesuits and colonizers are responsible for pisco’s growth, distillation existed long before the arrival of foreigners to Peru. According to T. Fairley in The Early History of Distillation, Peruvians were distilling native materials before colonization. He states: “In the 16th century, the Spaniards found the Peruvians using an apparatus of this kind…It is probable that the Peruvians used this apparatus long before the date of the Spanish conquest. ”(560).  The image below depicts the still described by Fairley (561):

pre columbian still, peru distillation

So what were native Peruvians distilling with this fascinating contraption? According to Fairley, piuchiu was the spirit of choice, made from fermented corn or yuca (known as chicha). Chicha is heavily consumed in Peru, especially in the Andes, where chicherías provide locals with endless supplies of the tangy corn ferment. A red plastic bag tied to a stick marks the entrance of a chichería, typically inside someone’s adobe home.

While fermented chicha is ubiquitous now, oddly you won’t find piuchiu in Peru. Somehow this distilling custom went out of practice. So how was piuchiu made? After fermenting the corn or yuca, the native Peruvians placed the fermented liquor, “into a deep earthen pot, having a hole in the side near the top, through which passes a wooden gutter of the form shown, connecting the receiver. Over the top a pan, filled with cold water and luted to the pot with clay, is placed. This acts as the condenser and the spirit flows along the groove into the bottle or receiver” (561).

piuchiu, distillation peru, pisco history Chart depicting ancient distilled spirits in various countries. Maize and manioc were the fermented base used to make Puichiu.

Another more rudimentary variation of a still was documented by Édouard Charton and illustrated by Édouard Riou in Le Tour Du Monde: Nouveau Journal Des Voyages. As seen below, the fermented liquid was boiled in a ceramic urn. Sheepskins were then hung over the boiling pot to catch the vapors. Once wet, the sheepskins were wrung out to extract the alcohol as it accumulated.

 

Ancient distillation Peru

In summary, while colonizers should receive credit for widespread distillation in Peru’s pisco-making history, T. Fairley’s research demonstrates Peruvians were distilling native ingredients before their arrival. In the end, this information is further proof of Peru’s diverse history, culture and delightful culinary portfolio.

 

 

Works Consulted:

Charton, Edouard, 1807-1890. Le Tour Du Monde: Nouveau Journal Des Voyages. Paris: Libraire de L. Hachette,

Fairley, T. The Early History of Distillation. Harrison and Sons, 1907.

Gutiérrez, Gonzalo. Pisco: Its Name, Its History. Editorial Académica Española, 2020.

All the Peruvian Pisco Grapes- Quebranta, Italia and 6 Others

The 4 aromatic pisco grapes are Albilla, Torontel, Italia and Moscatel. The 4 non-aromatic grapes are Quebranta, Uvina, Mollar and Negra Criolla. But before we explore each variety, first let’s talk about the 2 categories of pisco grapes: aromatic and non-aromatic. While the latter categorization might imply that some piscos lack aromas, it should be clarified that all varieties of Peruvian pisco have very expressive aromas. This often creates confusion for people not familiar with Peruvian pisco. They understandably expect a “non-aromatic” pisco to not have any aromas.

All the Peruvian pisco grapes have highly aromatic qualities because of production methods required by the Denomination of Origin in Peru. First, the single distillation method helps bring out the unique aromatic profile of each grape variety. Then, resting in neutral casks enhances aromas while preserving the pisco’s original identity. This is different than spirits that age in barrels whose flavors and aromas are altered by wood. Please watch the video below for more information.

 

 

Pisco Certificate Course and & PiscoLogia- What is Pisco?

In lesson 1 of the Pisco Certificate Course, you will learn about the pisco-making process from grapes to glass, the ABV levels permitted by the D.O. in Peru and how many grapes are in a bottle of pisco.

The rich history of pisco shows in the traditions performed throughout the entire production process, starting with agricultural and spiritual practices in the vineyards and ending when the pisco is consumed. Harvest of pisco grapes happens in Fall in Peru, typically in March or April. The ripe berries are plucked from the vines, giving the master distiller the raw materials needed to craft the perfect batch. The grapes are destemmed and crushed and maceration may or may not occur. With the help of yeasts, the sugar converts the grape juice to alcohol and the juice becomes wine, ready for distillation. Once distillation has converted the wine to pisco, the brandy must rest a minimum of 3 months in neutral vessels such as stainless steel or fiberglass. This makes pisco completely transparent and unaltered, allowing you to fully appreciate the original identity of the spirit. After resting, it can be bottled and is ready for consumption.

 

 

The Diversity of Peruvian Pisco

peruvian pisco, pisco peruano, 28 julio

We at PiscoLogía would like to celebrate pisco on 28 de julio, Independence Day in Peru. However, to celebrate pisco, we must celebrate the diversity behind the beloved grape-based spirit.

The first grape vine in South America was planted in Lima between 1539 and 1541 by Hernando de Montenegro, a Spanish captain. In 1551, the first wine was made by Spanish colonists.

The name “pisco” comes from Quechua, the language of the Incas.

The pre-Inca and Inca civilizations created very sophisticated agricultural and irrigation systems. Without indigenous land, agricultural knowledge manpower, viticulture would not have thrived like it has for hundreds of years.

Historically, the people who have planted, harvested and hauled the grapes have been Indigenous laborers and African slaves.

While distillation came to Peru with the Spanish, it is an Arabic technology.

Pisco is the fusion of peoples, cultures, and history. And with each sip we are honoring each and every one.

Myth #9- A wine-making ban led to pisco production in Peru

We are back to our series of mythbusters to clarify misconceptions about Peruvian pisco!

history wine peru, history pisco peru, pisco, peruvian pisco

 

Vintners in Peru started making pisco when Spain tried to hinder wine-making.  However, the story is more complicated than a simple restriction.

 

According to historian Guillermo Toro-Lira, the first vineyard in South America was planted in Lima between 1539 and 1541 by Hernando de Montenegro, a Spanish captain (Lima). The first wine was made in 1551, marking the beginning of a new era of wine-making in the New World. By the end of the 16th century, delicious Peruvian wine was demanded around the world, creating formidable competition for Spain’s winemakers.

To hinder wine production in Peru, Spanish royalty imposed high taxes, banned Peruvian wine in Spanish colonies and prohibited the planting of new vines in Peru. However, their attempts were unsuccessful until 1641, when King Philip IV prohibited the importation of Peruvian wine to Spain. Peru was then cut off from one of its last remaining markets. Here is a summary of the timeline:

  • 1539 -1541– First vine (Listán Prieto) planted in Lima by Hernando de Montenegro
  • 1551– First wine made in Lima, making Peru the first winemaking region in South America
  • 1595– Felipe II prohibited planting vines in the colonies. However, people continued planting and making wine.
  • 1595– Felipe II- started taxing vineyard owners, which diminished the amount of vines in Peru.
  • 1614– Peruvian wine was competing so much with Spanish wine that King Philip III prohibited the importation of Peruvian wine to Panama.
  • 1615– The sale of Peruvian wine was banned in Guatemala.
  • 1641– King Philip IV prohibited the importation of Peruvian wine to Spain. Since the market for wine was cut off, vintners in Peru began to use their grapes to make pisco.

 

Instead of abandoning their vines, locals began to use the grapes to make brandy in lieu of wine. Over time, the viticultural knowledge of the Spanish blended with agricultural traditions passed down from the Incas. Years of trial and error led to diversification and selection of the best varieties, identification of optimal regions for grape growing and improved production practices. These factors, along with a climate favorable to grape growing, have allowed Peruvians to proudly craft their national beverage for hundreds of years.

So now you know, a series of restrictions that spanned over the course of 100 years led Peruvians to start making clear brandy. While the decision was detrimental to the wine industry in Peru, thankfully Peruvians were able to use their grapes, knowledge and manpower to make pisco.

 

Sources:  

Huertas Vallejos, Lorenzo. “Historia De La Producción De Vinos y Piscos En El Perú.” Revista Universum, vol. 2, no. 19, 2004, pp. 44–61.

“Lima, Cuna Del Primer Viñedo y Del Primer Vino De Suramérica.” www.efe.com, 28 Sept. 2018, www.efe.com/efe/america/gente/lima-cuna-del-primer-vinedo-y-vino-de-suramerica/20000014-3763502.

 

Peruvian Pisco vs. Chilean Pisco

One of the most hotly debated subjects around the world is: “Is pisco Peruvian or Chilean”? Because indisputable historical and etymological evidence suggests that pisco was first produced in Perú, we firmly believe pisco is Peruvian.  So, in order to protect the Denomination of Origin for pisco in Perú, we will use the term “Chilean brandy”.

Despite the argument over the origin and ownership of pisco, it is indisputable that Peruvian pisco and Chilean brandy are very different distilled spirits. What follows is a comparison of both. In the chart below, we compare their production methods, the grape varieties used, their production zones and more.

peruvian vs. chilean pisco, is pisco peruvian?

PiscoLogía Quebranta Wins Gold Medal at the Women’s Wine and Spirits Awards in London

womens wine spirits award, spirits award, gold medal pisco, gold medal

 

LIMA, PeruNov. 16, 2019 — PiscoLogía Quebranta, a single-variety Peruvian pisco made from Quebranta grapes, won a gold medal at the most important wine and spirits competition in the world judged by women buyers – the Women’s Wine and Spirits Awards. Held in London at the Royal Yacht Club, 100 of the world’s most influential female buyers assembled for the historic occasion. Top retailers, importers, and hospitality entities were present for the blind tastings, including Waitrose & Partners, Bibendum, Enotria & Co, 67 Pall Mall, and The Arts Club.

The award reflects the quality and craftsmanship of the pisco, which is made in Azpitia, in the Denomination of Origin of Lima. “We are honored to receive this gold medal and celebrate the work completed with my partners Nati Gordillo and Kami Kenna. It is a culmination of years of dedication to the art of pisco making” said Meg McFarland, founder of PiscoLogía.

PiscoLogía is available in the USA through Craft Distillers, in Canada through the Unknown Agency and in Japan through The Blue Habu Trade Group.

 

 

About Piscología Pisco Puro Quebranta

Made from 100% estate-grown grapes, PiscoLogía Quebranta is the quintessential craft pisco. Its aromas are grassy, herbal, and reminiscent of sweet caramelized banana.  It tastes of toasted almonds, pecans and tart green apples.

 

About Topa Spirits, LLC

Topa Spirits, LLC is a 100% women-owned producer, importer and wholesaler of Piscología Pisco Quebranta and PiscoLogía Pisco Acholado.

Connect with PiscoLogía on Facebook, Twitter and www.piscologia.com for cocktail ideas, contests and breaking product news.

 

NOTES FOR NEWS EDITOR:

For further images, see link here: http://wineawards.org/medal-and-press-images/

Full results on https://wineawards.org/wwsa-2020-results/

スーパーコピー ブランドコピー コピーブランド ロレックス スーパーコピー ロレックス コピー パテックフィリップ コピー パテックフィリップ スーパーコピー モンクレール スーパーコピー モンクレール コピー モンクレール ダウン コピー シュプリーム スーパーコピー シュプリーム コピー ウブロ スーパーコピー ウブロ コピー